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Currently showing posts tagged natural dyes

  • Out of the dye pots...

    Here's what I've been up to and took with me to the trunk show at Yarntopia this past Saturday. What's left will be listed on my Etsy shop, Monday, November 14th at 7pm central time. (The spinning fiber is all sold, but I wanted to document it here, nonetheless. I hope to do more of it in the future!) I think the only color/bases not pictured here are "amarillo by mornin" and a lighter shade of "barely" in TexRanch WORSTED, both of which will be listed in the update tomorrow. 

    HIGHLAND BULKY 100 % U.S. grown & spun MERINO

    "serenity now" dyed with logwood

    "turquoise trail" dyed with Saxon blue

    "herb garden" dyed with rosemary, lavendar and Saxon blue

    "rainy day" dyed with cutch, saxon blue and cochineal

    "barely" dyed with avocado pits

    TexRanch WORSTED 52% Texas-raised kid mohair + 48% Texas-raised superfine merino; U.S. milled

    "westward glow" dyed with marigolds and avocado pits

    "prairie highlights" dyed with East Texas goldenrod

    "summer bouquet" dyed with marigolds, hibiscus, coreopsis and madder root

    "shibori" dyed with organic indigo

    "la botella" dyed with osage orange and organic indigo

    "distracted" dyed with logwood and cochineal

    "pokeweed" dyed with pokeweed, logwood and cochineal

    "thistle" dyed with Texas bullnettle, saxon blue and cochineal

    "new growth" dyed with osage orange and saxon blue

    "twilight" dyed with logwood

    "native summer" dyed with onions and marigolds

    "barely" dyed with hibiscus

    "Old Town" dyed with madder

    "desert in bloom" dyed with avocado (sometimes hibiscus) and cochineal 

    "spiral shell" dyed with avocado, onion and black walnut powder

    "blue jean jacket" dyed with organic indigo

    "straw bale" dyed with Texas bullnettle

    "leaf peeper" dyed with onion skins and saxon blue

    Interstate WORSTED 100% U.S. grown & milled superwash wool

    "blue jean jacket"

    "barely"

    "amarillo by mornin" dyed with cutch

    "palo duro" dyed with madder

    TexRanch LACE 52% Texas-raised kid mohair + 48% Texas-raised superfine merino; U.S. milled

    "la botella (light)" dyed with myrobalan and organic indigo

    "twilight"

    "mission" dyed with madder and indigo

    "spruce" dyed with onion skins and organic indigo

    "native summer"

    "blue jean jacket"

    Backroads WORSTED 100% Rambouillet, raised and milled in Wyoming

    "blue jean jacket"

    SPINNING FIBER

    Heritage breed, Gulf Coast Native Roving raised & milled in Texas

    "battle of flowers" dyed with marigolds

    Mohair locks from "Gidget" the goat, raised in Texas

    "shibori"

  • Texranch LACE at fibre space

    Here are all of the colors I sent to fibre space in Alexandria, VA a couple weeks back. If you're interested in getting some Texranch LACE of your own for a sweet summery shawl, just give 'em a call to see what's left and place a mail order! 703.664.0344

    Lavender is a favorite scent, color and plant of mine. (It's one of the few plants in my garden that survives all.) This skein's name may or may not be something I repeat to myself throughout some days. Sooooothing...

    Turquoise Trail is New Mexico State Rd 14, through northern NM. It's a national scenic byway through an area of the country that has always drawn me in. We eloped there!

    I love cactus blossoms and desert wildflowers. The speckles in this color way make me think of those pops of color amidst the sand. Google "Atacama desert in bloom" and you'll see one from my bucket list.

    This color brought me right back to enjoying my favorite treats in New Orleans:

    Golden, glowing... all from kitchen scraps. Natural dyeing is magical!

    Yellow blossoms on the roadside, in the pasture:

    Red dirt-ed Palo Duro canyon in the Texas panhandle is a little known gem (known to Texans, maybe). But totally worth a trip! My husband and I camped there on our way to New Mexico when we ran off to get married.

    This was a one-of-a-kind that I know a friend of mine snagged at the shop, but I will try my hand at it again. It made me think of the ancient (c. 1830's) farmhouse where we used to live in Vermont:

    New growth is good, and is always possible:

    Scattered showers (over new growth):

    "Enchanted", after the dome of pink granite in the Texas hill country known as Enchanted Rock. We camped there last year for my middle child's 8th birthday, on the night of a blue moon and a spectacular dry lightning storm. Native legends surround this landmark. It's even known to speak at night!

    Ever take the long way home just to see the sun set from the road? Or pull over to gaze at these colors in the sky? They were meant to be together:

    "Old Town" is a set of 3 mini reds that brought to mind brick sidewalks, bright red doors and the King Street Trolley from our old home in Northern Virginia:

    A darker shade of Palo Duro:

  • Yarntopia Trunk Show

    Woo-hoo! I'm pretty excited to take part in the yarn maker trunk show at my new LYS, Yarntopia (this Saturday, May 2nd, 10-2). If you're here on my blog thanks to the link in Sheryl's latest newsletter - Welcome! And welcome anyway if you're not!

    Let me introduce myself... I'm Sarah. Native Texan, recently returned after 10 years "abroad" ...that'd be Vermont and Washington, DC. We lived in the Montrose before we left 10 years ago, but with 3 kids (ages 10, 7 and 5) decided to call Katy home upon our return. Much of our family is here, and we are realizing you just can't beat being near family while you raise a family.

    I loved Vermont though. And I'm not ashamed to admit that, at least weekly, I entertain elaborate daydreams about owning an old farmhouse there, and how I will ultimately make that happen. It is my Soul State for sure. Sigh.

    DC was amazing, too! We were actually in Alexandria, VA. While there, I worked as a doula & childbirth educator, and also as a yarnista+ at my first LYS, fibre space. I miss my wooly community there something fierce and that is the main reason I am So Excited to attend this weekend's show -- Yes, I'd love to sell something, but mainly I just can't wait to get plugged in and meet some Texas yarn people.

    So, that's a bit about me personally.

    Blue Highway is commited to American wool and American milling. I want my little company to be a part of bringing our craft and our textiles home. I enjoy knowing about the ranch where my fiber was raised, and that the folks at my mill are committed to environmentally sound business practices, sheep to skein.

    Blue Highway yarns are artisinal; soft and rustic and (hopefully) reflective of a certain timeless American grace. I dye with natural dyes because that's what appeals to me - experimenting with living, growing, unpredictable, variable color. I also take joy in the seasonal aspect, and though many of my current dye extracts come from commercial suppliers, I plan on growing/harvesting more and more of them myself. I've planted a dye garden out back, and if you see someone alongside Highway 99 clipping black-eyed Susans, stop and say Howdy - it's probably me! kidding not kidding.

    Speaking of plans, I won't reveal them all here, but I will say I don't feel glued to yarn. Long term, I envision Blue Highway Hand Dyes branching out further into the textile arena as I learn more about the trade. 

    But, yes - for now? Yarn! Plenty of yarn. What I will have with me at the trunk show is just what I have dyed since starting out in February. Only 2 months ago! Wow. I can't believe that. It's not a ton, but it's a taste. 

    Here's a little peak: (some of these I've already shared over on Instagram)

    First up, a single-ply, fingering weight yarn. 100% Rambouillet wool, raised on a 4th generation ranch outside of Buffalo, WY. It is 380 yards; semi-slubby, rustic American wool, spun with a gentle twist, slightly energized. Very soft and shows beautifully in open lace-work. (I'll have a sample on to show it off!)

    Next, a pillowy 2-ply, 196 yard worsted weight Rambouillet.

    What is Rambouillet, by the way? It's an incredibly soft breed of sheep that originated from a Spanish Merino stock in the late 1700's that was known for producing some of the finest wool in the world. It does not itch, thanks to a nice, long staple length, and is still very similar to traditional Merino. (In fact, if you wear "merino" wool clothing that was manufactured in the USA, odds are it came from a Rambouillet sheep.)

    These were dyed with logwood, madder, quebracho, chestnut, cutch, osage orange, avocados, onion skins, cochineal, saxon blue, pomegranate, wattle... that's all I can think of at the moment, but there may be more. The yarn comes to me unwashed and untouched by harsh chemical processes. As such, there's the ocasional fleck of vegetable matter to prove it. And a high lanolin content, though I do wash the yarn prior to dyeing, with a gentle eco-friendly cleanser. I mordant with alum to improve wash and light fastness, and discharge the mordant bath into the dye garden. I cold-process mordant when I can to save energy and avoid heating the fiber more than I must.  You can trust that a lot of thought goes into each step of the process. This is Slow Yarn for sure. 

    I can't wait to meet at least some of you on Saturday! If anyone is still reading at this point, and even if you can't make it out on Saturday, I do hope you will follow along here and take part in this fun new journey.